The Human Eye

The Human Eye

card-4680040-backThe human eye transmits light into the brain which interprets the signals and provides information about the environment. It is an extremely sensitive organ but also surprisingly durable in it’s design. It is filled with aqueous solution (vitreous humor) that allows it to transmit light to the retinal walls but also to be flexible enough to absorb and dissipate kinetic energy. The eye ball is also surrounded by fatty tissues and held in place by six ocular muscles (see diagram above) as well as tendons, a vein, artery and nerves. The actual eye socket (orbit) is conical in shape, similar to a miniature ice cream cone, and tapers backwards to where the optic nerve enters into the brain. The eye muscles are essential for all the eye’s movements to allow for seeing the environment as well as provide some limited protection. The cornea is the outer most surface of the eye and protects the lens apparatus. There are over one million nerve endings in and around the eye. All animal species have an adversely reactive negative response to optical injuries.